Tag Archives: holidays

En la cima - On the summit

Pico Ferreirúa – The highest point in Teverga 1941m…

We picked a cooler day to do our walk up Ferreirua, the highest peak in the ‘concejo’ of Teverga, and that proved a blessing on the steepest parts of the hike.  As we did when we did Huerto del Diablo  we set of from Puerto Ventana after a short car ride.

This time the sky was grey so the views were not as stunning but at least we could see where we were going and it looked like a great walk. The path was relatively easy to follow  (we followed our nose without a map) and the first km or so wasn´t to steep and kind of skirted round the first obvious peak. However, the first hill proper was a bit of a shock with about 75m of very steep climbing which left us out of breath but improved the views. And from there we ascended via a series of steepish ascents and short descents over several small hills. The path was obvious and the ground pretty easy and forgiving.

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Then after about 2.8km the ground got a bit more mountainous and rocky and we semi-scrambled along a series of ridges each sharper and rockier than the last. These were fun as there were no serious drops and the path was easy to follow but they were a bit slow and awkward. At the end of the ridge we thought we were at the summit but in fact there was one last short, rocky descent and ascent to gain the top, which was marked by a small cairn.

As we reached the summit the clouds lifted and a bit of sun shone giving us stunning views into León and the Parque Natural de Somiedo, where some even bigger challenges lie!!

The map of our ascent.

The map of our ascent.

Overall this was a fun walk with some steep bits, some rocky traversing and as ever great views. We did it in about 3+ hrs with quite a few short stops and a 10 year old. Once again this would make a brilliant mountain run…

Follow us on Strava to see all our activities we are – Casa Quiros

Casa Quiros – Climb Bike Hike Run Relax…

 

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Horse trekking in Parque las Ubiñas

The Parque Natural de las Ubiñas, which straddles Quirós and our neighbouring counties of Teverga and Lena, is the youngest of all the Asturian natural parks. It’s a stunning mountainous landscape with spectacular high peaks, glaciated valleys and ancient woodlands and is criss-crossed with an extensive network of trails that makes exploring it relatively simple and infinitely appealing, be it on foot, bike or horse back. If you’re lucky enough to get the right conditions in winter you could even pull on your  snowshoes or cross-country skis out on the tops.

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Perhaps the best-known of these trails is the Camin Real de la Mesa which follows the old Roman road that crosses the mountain tops linking the provinces of Asturias and León. It forms part of the Via de La Plata, an ancient trade and pilgrimage route that ran all the way along the west side of Spain from south to north. Linking up to it at various points are a seeming infinity of other local paths.

Last September I had the good fortune to explore 60kms of this network of trails on a two-day circular horse ride in a group accompanied by a super-knowledgeable local guide, Paco from Cuadra Sobia stables. On the Saturday we climbed up through dramatic limestone gorges, enjoyed the dappled shade of extensive beech and chestnut forests and clip-clopped past waterfalls, stopping to picnic at a braña (an ancient settlement of the native nomadic cowherds, vaqueiros de alzada) from where we continued up to the roof of Asturias at Puerto Ventana.

From here we pitched over and down into León where we overnighted in an albergue.  The next day we looped back down to our starting point at Cuadra Sobia, via the extensive and spectacular plateau where Somiedo, Teverga and León meet. In the whole weekend we didn’t repeat a single section of trail and barely set hoof on tarmac. Apart from a few walkers by Xiblu waterfall the only company we encountered on the trails were wild horses and a few cows.

All in all an amazing experience that has whetted my appetite for continued exploration of these majestic mountains. Although from now on I shall be mainly staying on foot – two days in the saddle after 20 years without mounting a horse rather took its toll!

Casa Quiros facilities – a selection of bikes perfect for the Senda del Oso

Just below Casa Quiros, next to the lake, runs the Senda del Oso which, roughly translated means ‘the bear path’. Now one of the most popular things to do in Asturias the Senda started life as the railway line which connected the mines of Quiros and Teverga to Oviedo. However, once the mines shut it became obvious to utilize the flattish tracks and tunnels to make a brilliant cycle/running route.

The Senda del Oso

The Senda del Oso

This route or just part of it makes great day out, either as a rest day from climbing or simply as a fun activity on its own – walking, running or biking. Obviously you’ll cover most ground on bikes and although there are plenty of bike rental companies if you rent Casa Quiros we have a selection of bikes all of which are suitable for the ‘off-road’ nature of the Senda.

Obviously a couple of these are true mountain bikes and so could be taken on some of the more demanding tracks which can be found around the house.

The bikes at Casa Quoros

The bikes at Casa Quiros

And we also have a bike with an attachable baby seat for those who bring a child under 5!

And for those who are very keen, one of the most popular events – and one of the hardest – is the half-marathon which takes places each year on the Senda del Oso. I did it a couple of years ago as my first ever race and if you’re up to it it’s a pretty cool event. It’s on 28th October this years and here’s a link: -https://carreraspopularesasturias.com/carreras/proaza/media-maraton-senda-del-oso-2020/

My first race

My first race!! – team Senda del Oso…

New-coveer

Teverga from the air…

For those who don’t know how much rock we have or what they’re missing in if they haven’t climbed in Teverga – which is a short 15min drive from Quirós – here’s an aerial view of some of the 35 (or more) sectors which make up this brilliant destination.

There’s close to 1000 routes here and thanks to the work of the dedicated local club Grupo Escalada Aguja de Sobia there are more routes and sectors being opened every year.

You can see the size and scale if you check out the cars on the road…

The guide to the area is available on my page http://bit.ly/BuyRocaVerde2 and if you need somewhere we’re here for you…

Sobrevilla to Pica Siella and back round – 15km circular route. Sept 2017.

For my second go at this ‘running’ lark my choice of run and partner may seem even stranger. This time I picked a guy whose idea of fun is to do 100 mile races!!

And my choice of run was pretty spectacular too. For a long time I had wanted to climb the huge gully that went up from the village of Sobrevilla and which passed a number of massive crags that I wanted to have a look at. So my reasoning was more about checking out future rock routes than ‘running’ (and I also figured that I’d be able to leverage plenty of rest by stopping to admire the rock).

As we set off the hill seemed huge, and I’d chosen to wear my mountain boots which, although very light for boots were about 500gms each. I was figuring on protecting my bad ankle (and I know better now) but that meant each stride was lass energy efficient and by 10 minutes in I was panting!!

The mist rolled in as we ascended leaving an eerie sensation and a slight feeling of being lost as we crossed a steep, blocky, rocky section only to emerge above the fog into the gully proper.

Chase the dog checks out the view as we climb out of the mist..

Chase the dog checks out the view as we climb out of the mist..

The gully was steep, very, very steep and progress wasn’t quick. Steep, with no path and small heathery clumps it wasn’t  easy going but I was enjoying it and Ian said that at this level of steepness even world class runners wouldn’t run (which I was pleased about).

The view down the gully...

The view down the gully…

As we slowly scaled the metres the views became more and more spectacular and although we weren’t going quickly Ian was quite happy to go at my pace. For me I was starting to understand a bit more that the world of trail running often didn’t involve ‘running’ but ascending as fast as one can. And i could get that…

And the close up views of the crags were as spectacular as I had wanted and my plan of stopping to check out the climbing lines was working to perfection.

Looking up the gully...

Looking up the gully…

There were some very big pieces of rock and we passed right underneath them. It was fun and the ‘rock-watching’ broke up the severity of the climbing. Nearing the top we had to decide on an exit – left or right. Left seemed easier but longer and right seemed more direct but with a ‘step’ that might prove tricky – it was obvious that we’d have to climb it but could we get the dog up there??

The step was a few metres of wet limestone but starting from a ledge so the consequences of a slip were not worth contemplating. Ian went first and made it easily and I, a bit more reluctantly, grabbed a slightly scared dog by the collar and shuffled along the small ledge. I  proceeded to shove the dog upwards as my feet scrabbled and I grabbed onto loose turf with my free hand. After a minute or so of struggle she was high enough up for Ian to grab her collar and I, mightily relieved was able to gain the firmer ‘terra firma’ above the drop.

What a position...

What a position…

As we gained the ridge we started to traverse up towards the high point of Pico Siella. But first we passed a viewpoint that was irresistible, a gap in the rocks opened out with a small spiky summit and we both ascended to get the photo…

We arrived at Pico Siella soon after and at 1550m it afforded incredible views of the valley and was well deserved of being the high point of our journey (twice as it turned out). We’d ascended over 800m (2400ft) already and although it hadn’t been quick it hadn’t been ridiculously slow either which I took some pride in. So we stopped briefly, set up a selfie with my camera balanced on the trig point, and got the all important summit shot.

On the peak...

On the peak…

Finally, the real running started and Ian, showing lot of agility, started out across a thin ridge which led slowly down to a more defined path than we’d been following. This was fun and after about a kilometre of me stomping in my big boots after the much more rapid Ian we met up at a small resevoir/lake at the coll before the big descent started.

‘Hold there Ian’ I shouted as I fumbled for the camera to get another shot of the run…But I couldn’t find it!

‘Arse’ I cried, ‘Ian, I seem to have lost the camera’ and it wasn’t a cheap one! About £300′s worth of Panasonic seemed to have gone missing during our descent – my pack had been open and the probability was that it had bounced out during our decent. That was the probability but it seemed odd as my small pack was actually quite deep, so with heavy hearts (especially mine) we set up back towards Pico Siella scouring the path either side. I walked a lot more slowly than Ian and it was he rather than me that made it back to the summit and found, still stood in selfie position, the camera! I’d simply left it on the summit.

We descended again and this time didn’t stop at the lake and headed on down the very steep switchbacks on a concrete farmers track which led directly up to the coll. With a ‘I’m going to go a bit quicker on this bit’ Ian blasted off. Once again his agility and speed left me standing and I kept up as best as I could as we descended about 400m in around 2km. Once again i was happy that I vaguely kept up but my big boots certainly didn’t aid me much.

We met up at the bottom and started to descend, less steeply, a series of muddy tracks back towards the car. Unfortunately (for Ian) we picked up a couple of ‘passengers’ on the way in the shape of two beautiful mastin puppies who followed us for about a kilometer downhill. However, when we realised the wouldn’t go ‘home’ I volunteered the more experienced runner for the duty of leading them back to the field we’d first seen them in.

I chuckled to myself plodded on downwards, tiring, and expecting to see Ian on my shoulder quite quickly. However, I’d made it a lot further than I thought I would and when Ian did catch  me he was out of breath ‘Man that was grim’ he said ‘ that track I took up was muddy as hell and it was longer than I thought. I grinned and said something about ‘good training mate’ and we finally exited the muddy forest track onto a tarmac’d road and I knew that the car was just around the corner.

The coffee and cake we enjoyed at the bar in town tasty scrummy and as well looked back up to where we’d been I felt pretty proud that I’d done it. And even Ian felt i’d done pretty well – especially for a climber that didn’t like hiking or running. This was a superb and fun route to do and well recommendable (maybe minus the ‘step’) and you can see the route on Ian’s Strava below…

https://www.strava.com/activities/1162680401

 

The route

The route

Climbing with Children at Quirós

Not every day’s climbing is about ‘sending the gnar’ (as some of our American friends like to say ;-) ). Sometimes just getting to the crag can be an achievement in itself. Take the other Saturday. I was here in Casa Quiros, car-less and partner-less, all set for an afternoon of house-bound pottering with our 6 year old son when I was messaged by some friends, a group of mums who climb. Turned out they were heading cragging here to Quirós. The perfect excuse to ditch the duster!

3 Mums climbing with their 4 kids - mission accomplished!

3 Mums climbing with their 4 kids – mission accomplished!

It was a beautiful afternoon so, even with an easily-tired six year old in tow, the walk from Casa Quiros to the base of the crag was a pure delight. We caught up with our friends halfway along the path – two brave mums with 3 small children. Brave because the first rule of doing anything with children (imho) is try and not let them outnumber you! This goes double for climbing but despite the odds being stacked against us we made it pretty painlessly to La Selva.

La Selva sector is a great spot for families and beginners with a wide, tree-shaded base at the foot of the climbing and a ton of easier routes, including some very fine slabs that go at between grade 4 and 5.  The perfect place for setting up camp for an afternoon.

Climbing in a three meant that there was always one mum with her hands free to supervise the four little ones, who ranged in age from 2 to 6. To be frank, this task would make sending sevens seem easy but sharing it between us and breaking it up with some 5 star routes helped preserve our sanity!

In fact we were all having such a good time that it wasn’t until twilight that we finally got ourselves packed up and headed back down. It’s a good thing the path is wide and easy! And so we arrived home with smiles on our faces and a real sense of achievement despite having no ‘gnar’ to report :-)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Review of Casa Quiros 17042015

This new review is from Henriette and Frido who stayed at the house last week…

Review from Frido and Henriëtte. (Netherlands)
We stayed three days in April 2015. Casa Quirós provided us all the comforts of home. The garden and balcony are in the sun all day long, perfect for drinking a beer after a day’s climbing. All the climbing sectors at Quirós are within walking distance of the house. Our host Richie provided us with info on the best climbing routes in the area. All the crags we went to had magnificent views as well as perfect rock and protection. We consider Asturias to be one of the best places we have climbed and we’ll certainly be back some time.

Review van Frido en Henriëtte. (Nederland)
We zijn drie dagen gebleven in april 2015. Casa Quirós voorzag in alle gemakken van thuis. Tuin en balkon liggen de hele dag in de zon, perfect om een biertje te drinken na een dag klimmen. Alle sectoren van Quirós bevinden zich op loopafstand van het huisje. Onze gastheer Richie die tevens de klimtopo van het gebied heeft geschreven gaf ons alle info over de beste routes op de diverse wanden. Bij alle wanden die we hebben bezocht was het uitzicht adembenemend, de rots totaal niet afgeklommen en de behaking optimaal. Asturië is één van de mooiste plekken waar we hebben geklommen en we komen zeker een keer terug.

The Vuelta 2014

On Monday the Vuelta de España passed within a few hundred metres of Casa Quirós, so naturally we walked down the hill to watch the peleton fly by. It would be rude not to, right?

To put the local road-biking terrain into perspective for you, this stage of the Vuelta was the ‘reina etapa’; or ‘queen stage’. That is to say, the potentially decisive one; the hardest and hilliest of the entire tour (not one where the riders dress in drag ;-) ) By the time they passed the bottom of our road the riders had already completed 3 mountain passes and still had 2 more to go.

They certainly deserved some cheering on and our neighbours were in fine voice to do so. However, as they urged on the mid-field stragglers, some 5 minutes behind the leaders at this point, with cries of ‘You’re right with them, keep it going,’ our 4 year-old son piped up in equally loud voice: ‘No you’re not. You’re miles behind!’ Ah, the honesty of small children…..

If you want to see the whole stage you can watch it here:

http://www.rtve.es/alacarta/videos/vuelta-ciclista-a-espana/vuelta-ciclista-espana-2014-16-etapa-san-martin-rey-aurelio-farrapone-lsomiedo/2745889/